‘Tricked’ bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments

Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria’s cells. Targeting these pores could make current antibiotics more effective or allow for the development of antibiotic-free drugs that can use these openings. When subjected to certain stimuli, such as a dramatic increase of pressure inside the cell, pores in the cell membranes act like an emergency escape valve, opening up to allow liquid to flood out of the cell to prevent it from bursting.

Read the full press release on the University of Leeds website

Read Allosteric activation of an ion channel triggered by modification of mechanosensitive nano-pockets on the Nature website